death--to--pigs

Josef Mengele - SS Officer and physician in Auschwitz Concentration Camp during World War II. Notorious for his selection of victims to be killed in the gas chambers and for performing unscientific and often deadly human experiments on prisoners. 
"He was capable of being so kind to the children, to have them become fond of him, to bring them sugar, to think of small details in their daily lives, and to do things we would genuinely admire … And then, next to that, … the crematoria smoke, and these children, tomorrow or in a half-hour, he is going to send them there. Well, that is where the anomaly lay."

Josef Mengele - SS Officer and physician in Auschwitz Concentration Camp during World War II. Notorious for his selection of victims to be killed in the gas chambers and for performing unscientific and often deadly human experiments on prisoners. 

"He was capable of being so kind to the children, to have them become fond of him, to bring them sugar, to think of small details in their daily lives, and to do things we would genuinely admire … And then, next to that, … the crematoria smoke, and these children, tomorrow or in a half-hour, he is going to send them there. Well, that is where the anomaly lay."

death--to--pigs
death—to—pigs:

lovelyloathsome:
“We have it on good facts that he was considered somewhat of a ‘honey’ in the gay community, that people found him attractive.  Several people told us that he was the kind of guy that you wanted to take care of, you wanted to baby him.”
- Detective Patrick Kennedy talking about how other gay men in Milwaukee related to Jeffrey Dahmer

death—to—pigs:

lovelyloathsome:

“We have it on good facts that he was considered somewhat of a ‘honey’ in the gay community, that people found him attractive.  Several people told us that he was the kind of guy that you wanted to take care of, you wanted to baby him.”

- Detective Patrick Kennedy talking about how other gay men in Milwaukee related to Jeffrey Dahmer

death--to--pigs

In an interview with Russian tabloid Tvoi Den, Alexander Pichushkin spoke his thoughts on human life:
"Human life is not too long. It is cheaper than a sausage. My lawyer: I would cut him open like a fish. I would have killed him like an insect, and I would receive much pleasure from the process. I would cut him up and make belts out of his flesh. But as for remembering everyone I killed, who and when and where, that, I don’t remember. I don’t even care to remember."
Gif source: (X)Source: (X)

In an interview with Russian tabloid Tvoi Den, Alexander Pichushkin spoke his thoughts on human life:

"Human life is not too long. It is cheaper than a sausage. My lawyer: I would cut him open like a fish. I would have killed him like an insect, and I would receive much pleasure from the process. I would cut him up and make belts out of his flesh. But as for remembering everyone I killed, who and when and where, that, I don’t remember. I don’t even care to remember."

Gif source: (X)
Source: (X)

death--to--pigs

“She was afraid of me but, at the same time, she too was afraid to go through the dark forest. So passed 5 or 10 minutes. I left her with the bag, which had a hammer. She reached into it, probably saw the hammer and pulled away abruptly. I walked over and we still sat and then I quietly took out the hammer, stood up and repeatedly struck her on the head. Wheeze, brains, blood … as always.”

- Pichushkin on the murder of Marina Moskalyova, June 13/14, 2006

congenitaldisease

congenitaldisease:

The catastrophic nuclear disaster the world had long feared finally happened in 1986 at the Chernobyl plant in Ukraine. Reactor number four exploded early one morning in April, sending a vast plume of radioactive fallout in the atmosphere. This would contaminate large areas of the western Soviet Union and Europe, with nuclear rain being recorded as far away as Ireland. The initial power excursion was followed by further chemical and has explosions, then fire. Unlike those in most western plants, the reactor building was not a reinforced containment vessel designed to limit the effects of just such an accident. It was therefore destroyed, allowing disastrous quantities of radioactive material to escape. Yet this was an accident that could have been avoided.

Ironically, the catalyst was an experiment carried out to test reactor safety. Operators were worried that a power failure might result in the reactor core overhearing, as vast quantities of cooling water were required and standby generators didn’t get the pumps back up to speed for over a minute. They therefore decided to test wether an emergency core-cooling procedure would work should such a situation arise. Had regulations been followed there would have been no problem, but safety features were disabled in order to complete the test. This decision proved fatal. After complex setup procedures were completed, the test commenced but within seconds the core went critical and a powerful explosion rocked the plant.

The aftermath was horrific, though Soviet authorities initially tried to conceal the scale of the disaster. The town of Pripyat was evacuated the following day and remains a deserted time capsule. The accident site was contained within a vast concrete sarcophagus at the centre of the 30km exclusion some around Chernobyl that is in force to this day.